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Magnesium and Heart Health

Magnesium and Heart Health

Magnesium, an Essential Nutrient for Heart Health

 

Magnesium has become a hot topic in nutrition today. It is an essential nutrient and involved in 300 biochemical reactions in the body. Half of the body’s supply is found in the bone to support the inner matrix. Magnesium helps maintain muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, supports the immune system, and helps keep bones strong. It also helps regulate blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and is involved in your cellular energy metabolism.

 

 

 

How Does Magnesium Levels Affect The Heart?

 

A recently published review of studies from Harvard’s School of Public Health bolsters the support for magnesium’s role in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.* The review, which included data for over 313,000 people from 16 studies, found a 30% reduced risk of cardiovascular and disease associated with high blood levels and dietary intake of at least 250 mg a day was associated with a 22% lower risk of ischemic heart disease. Essentially, it appears that the more you eat, the healthier it is for your heart.

 

How Many Magnesium Tablets Should I Take A Day?

 

The recommended daily intake for magnesium is 320 mg for women and 420 mg for men – amounts that many adult Americans fail to meet according to government surveys. It is fairly much ubiquitous in healthy foods – green vegetables, grains, and nuts – all contain it. For instance, a cup of spinach has 80 mg, an ounce of cashews has 75 mg, a bowl of oatmeal has 60 mg, and a baked potato has 50 mg, so it is possible to readily meet your needs.  However, most people don’t eat enough healthy foods or get enough magnesium. If you are one of these people, you may benefit from magnesium supplementation.

 

Bottom line: To get more of this important mineral, eat a wide variety of magnesium rich foods, such as leafy green veggies, beans, nuts, whole grains, and fish, and take a magnesium supplement, if you don’t get enough in the diet.

*Del Gobbo LC. Am J Clin Nutr 2013; 98:160-173

 

 

THE ABOVE MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC MATERIAL IS FOR CONSUMER INFORMATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. NOTHING IN THIS ARTICLE IS INTENDED AS, OR SHOULD BE CONSTRUED AS, MEDICAL ADVICE. CONSUMERS SHOULD CONSULT WITH THEIR OWN HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS FOR INDIVIDUAL, MEDICAL RECOMMENDATIONS. THE INFORMATION HAS NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THESE PRODUCTS ARE NOT INTENDED FOR USE AS A MEANS TO CURE, TREAT, PREVENT, DIAGNOSE, OR MITIGATE ANY DISEASE OR OTHER MEDICAL OR ABNORMAL CONDITION.

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